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dc.contributor.authorFitton N
dc.contributor.authorDatta A
dc.contributor.authorHastings A
dc.contributor.authorKuhnert M
dc.contributor.authorTopp CFE
dc.contributor.authorCloy JM
dc.contributor.authorRees RM
dc.contributor.authorCardenas LM
dc.contributor.authorWilliams JR
dc.contributor.authorSmith K
dc.contributor.authorChadwick D
dc.contributor.authorSmith P
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-03T12:17:06Z
dc.date.available2014-10-03T12:17:06Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citation9:9 095003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/9/9/095003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11262/10498
dc.description.abstractThe United Kingdom currently reports nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture using the IPCC default Tier 1 methodology. However Tier 1 estimates have a large degree of uncertainty as they do not account for spatial variations in emissions. Therefore biogeochemical models such as DailyDayCent (DDC) are increasingly being used to provide a spatially disaggregated assessment of annual emissions. Prior to use, an assessment of the ability of the model to predict annual emissions should be undertaken, coupled with an analysis of how model inputs influence model outputs, and whether the modelled estimates are more robust that those derived from the Tier 1 methodology. The aims of the study were (a) to evaluate if the DailyDayCent model can accurately estimate annual N2O emissions across nine different experimental sites, (b) to examine its sensitivity to different soil and climate inputs across a number of experimental sites and (c) to examine the influence of uncertainty in the measured inputs on modelled N2O emissions. DailyDayCent performed well across the range of cropland and grassland sites, particularly for fertilized fields indicating that it is robust for UK conditions. The sensitivity of the model varied across the sites and also between fertilizer/manure treatments. Overall our results showed that there was a stronger correlation between the sensitivity of N2O emissions to changes in soil pH and clay content than the remaining input parameters used in this study. The lower the initial site values for soil pH and clay content, the more sensitive DDC was to changes from their initial value. When we compared modelled estimates with Tier 1 estimates for each site, we found that DailyDayCent provided a more accurate representation of the rate of annual emissions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isformatof13800en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Research Lettersen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2014 IOP Publishing. Content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.en_US
dc.subjectDailyDayCenten_US
dc.subjectNitrous oxide emissionsen_US
dc.subjectSensitivity and uncertainty analysisen_US
dc.subjectMonte-Carlo simulationen_US
dc.subjectUK croplands and grasslandsen_US
dc.titleThe challenge of modelling nitrogen management at the field scale: simulation and sensitivity analysis of N2O fluxes across nine experimental sites using DailyDayCenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublisher PDFen_US


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